Game Design, Game Reviews

Game Review: Monster Crush Dash – Silly errors can ruin the experience

iconMonster Crush Dash is a Candy Crush clone which will, most certainly, find its audience in the vast plains of the internet. The game is a match-three-or-more-tiles style of game, but instead of the usual jewels, candy or simple colours, we’re presented with monsters of different shapes and colours.

Available on Google PlayThe game is simple, learning curve is flat and it is beautifully drawn. With a couple of extras, and a well-built in-game shop, it can offer many hours of entertainment. However, it has a couple of silly mistakes that make the game look sloppy and unfinished, but once those are fixed, I’m certain it will be a great game.

The silliness

monster screen 1

Kannst du understand what ich sage?

I have to start by pointing out the negatives, mostly because they’re silly, largely pointless and quite easily repairable. The first thing you see when you load the game is a couple of monsters, a large Play button, and two options written in German and English at the same time: “Freunde einladen And get 10 Free Coins,” and “Verbinden.”

It made me wonder if the game was in German or English and after looking at who built the game, I came to a conclusion that the game was originally in German and then badly translated to English. The game was built by Sven Herzog, also the creator of Ninja Girl, Jumping Ninja Girl and Running Man games.

The second insanity I found in the game was the farm. I have written about this before and it seems I’m being haunted by it – why are people making farms for their level pickers?  Similar to other games that have absolutely no link to farming whatsoever, Monster Crush Dash starts by showing you a tiny farm with a curvy path to the sea. Along the path are levels which you pick before actually playing the game.

I get the feeling that the creator first wanted to make a Farmville clone, changed his mind halfway through, and then ended up making a Candy Crush clone, but forgot to change the level picker.

The shop

monster screen 2The game has positives which should also be noticed. The in-game shop is among the better ones I’ve had the chance to try out. It is rich (offers a total of 12 different features), has an in-game currency (coins), and also takes real money through microtransactions.

I also like it (and I spoke about it in other reviews, as well) when the shop isn’t there just to justify its existence and is, in fact, a useful part of the game. The boosts the shop offers, such as extra moves for levels which are move-limited, extra time for levels which are speed-oriented and the shake booster which shuffles the entire deck, you will find yourself purchasing extras and not feeling like you’re just wasting money.

Besides spending real money, you can also watch ads to gather coins, and share the game on Facebook.

A recommended product

Looking at the game as a whole, I have no problem recommending it to anyone. It’s a well-built, stable game with good graphics, proven gameplay mechanics and a quality shop for extra value.

It does have its flaws, which make it look sloppy and hinders the overall experience. Unifying the game’s language is a small change which will make a huge difference. Personally, I’d change the farm, but it can stay – it’s not a game changer.

I’m allergic to game farms and that’s just me.

Edit: After publishing this review, the game’s creator has reached out to us, saying that the errors have been fixed. We’re glad to be of service 🙂

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